Simply Prevents the Firing of Employees for Refusal to Pay Union Dues or Fees
S.391 (U.S. Senate)- National Right To Work Act H.R.612 (U.S. House) - National Right To Work Act
Model State Right To Work Law
Model State Right To Work Law  -- The National Right To Work Committee is providing this model legislation for elected officials and staff as suggested first draft language for Right To Work legislation.

Freedom from Union Violence Act

Current Legislation: S.62 – Freedom From Union Violence Act of 2015 (U.S. Senate; introduced by Sen. Vitter, David (R-LA) 

The Freedom from Union Violence Act closes a loophole in the federal Hobbs Anti-Extortion Act, eliminating the special judicially-created exemption in this law for union-related violence and extortion and holding union officials to the same legal standards as other Americans.This legislation would establish that the 1946 Hobbs Act applies to all Americans, including union officials seeking to advance so-called “legitimate union objectives.” Present law offers this unique exemption for union officials.

NILRR union violence investigations have determined that union violence is responsible for at least 203 Americans deaths since 1975; 5,869 incidents of personal injury; and more than 6,435 incidents of vandalism and tens of millions of dollars in property damage.

The National Right To Work Foundation worked to defend victims of a UAW campaign of  terror that included shootings and severed cows’ heads visited upon workers in Winchester,Virginia, in the late 1990's.

The National Right To Work Foundation worked to defend victims of a UAW campaign of terror that included shootings and  a severed cows’ head
visited upon a lady’s car in Winchester,Virginia, in the late 1990’s.

Congress need not extend federal jurisdiction over law enforcement to crack down on union violence. All Congress need do is ensure the 53-year-old Hobbs Act is even-handedly applied so that union officials cannot get away with crimes for which other Americans are rightly punished.

The Freedom from Union Violence Act would accomplish this task by clarifying the Hobbs Act, making it plain that union officials must be held accountable under this law for the violence they foment.

Union violence has been a scourge on American workers for decades.

Union thugs have vandalized equipment, torched buildings, and even murdered people, for the simple act of working non-union. Countless victims have lost their property, their health, their livelihoods, and even their lives to union violence.

According to the National Institute for Labor Relations Research (NILRR), there have been over 12,000 incidents of union violence reported by American media since 1975.

This figure is all the more appalling, given that studies show 80%-90% of violent union incidents that get reported to police are never reported in the media.

That means there have been more than 50,000 incidents of union violence over the past 40 years.

And that’s not even scratching the surface of incidents never reported to the police.

The union bosses that coordinate these crime virtually never face justice because of an outrageous loophole in the Hobbs anti-extortion law.