Beleaguered Local Cops 'Completely Outnumbered'

Beleaguered Local Cops 'Completely Outnumbered'

In southwestern Washington last month, overpowered police were unable to prevent bat- and ax handle-wielding union toughs from systematically sabotaging a $200 million grain terminal. No arrests were made at the scene. Credit: AP Photo/Don Ryan Bat- and Pipe-Wielding Union Thugs Rampage in Washington State (Source: October 2011 NRTWC Newsletter) For decades, Right to Work advocates have fought to close the judicially created loophole in federal anti-extortion law that exempts threats, vandalism and violence perpetrated to secure so-called "legitimate union objectives," including monopoly-bargaining and forced-dues privileges over employees. In explaining the importance of closing the loophole created 38 years ago in the U.S. Supreme Court's controversial 5-4 Enmons decision, National Right to Work Committee spokesmen and their allies have pointed out, time and again, that local and state law enforcement are often overwhelmed by violent union conspiracies. Just last month, the local police in Longview, Wash., a Columbia River port town, became the latest case in point. At 4:30 AM on September 8, hundreds of International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU/AFL-CIO) militants stormed a new grain terminal at the Port of Longview. Big Labor thugs broke down the gates, overwhelmed six security guards, and then converged on the terminal of EGT, a joint venture of U.S., Japanese, and South Korean companies that has been targeted by ILWU chiefs. A week later, security guard Charlie Cadwell testified before U.S. District Judge Ronald Leighton that every ILWU "protester" he saw that night was carrying a baseball bat, lead pipe, garden tool, or other weapon. As the AP reported, Mr. Cadwell told the judge he was first pulled out of his car by one Big Labor zealot, then another swung a metal pipe at him. "I told him," Mr. Cadwell continued, "You have 50 cameras on you, and law enforcement is on its way. He said, '(Expletive) you. We're not here for you; we're here for the train.'" Meanwhile, yet another union militant drove off with his car and eventually ran it into a ditch. Mr. Cadwell said "about 40 to 50 people were throwing rocks at him, and that he was hit between his eyes and in his knee," according to the AP account. 'I Wasn't About' to Stop 'These People From Doing Whatever It Is They Were Going to Do' The ILWU lawbreakers in Washington State evidently feel no more compunction about using threats and violence against police than they do about assaulting and terrorizing security guards.

Wounded Ohio Contractor: 'I'm in Disbelief'

Wounded Ohio Contractor: 'I'm in Disbelief'

Shooting Victim's Workers, Firm Have Long Been Big Labor Targets (Source: September 2011 NRTWC Newsletter) Having grown over the course of several decades into one of the largest union-free electrical contracting businesses in the Toledo, Ohio, area, King Electrical Services and its employees are seasoned in dealing with Big Labor harassment, threats and violence. John King started the firm during the 1970's, after first working for a unionized electrical contractor and serving a stint in the military. In his business's early days, Mr. King recalls, "it was nothing to have to regularly buy a new set of tires. The ice pick was the weapon of choice." During a mid-eighties strike, King Electrical, which then had just eight or nine employees, was picketed by more than 50 International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW/AFL-CIO) union militants. One employee had his car trashed and was also beaten up by IBEW thugs. The harassment and violence have never stopped. Just during the first half of this year, goons hurled rocks through King Electrical's shop-front windows, and smashed the windows and slashed the tires of the company's trucks in separate incidents. But somehow none of this prepared Mr. King for what happened to him on the night of August 10, while his wife was away with their grandchildren. After waking up at his home in Monroe County, Mich., 2.5 miles from Toledo, Mr. King noticed that the motion lights in his driveway had come on. He then looked out his front window and saw a man who appeared to be breaking into his SUV. 'It's Not So Surprising That Union Militants Think They're Above the Law' As a resident of a neighborhood where violent crime is practically unheard of, Mr. King unhesitatingly walked out his front door to yell at the apparent thief. So confident was Mr. King that his home was his "safe haven" from the Big Labor thuggery he and his employees have often faced on the job, in fact, that, prone and bloodied in front of his house a few seconds later, he didn't realize he'd been shot.

Wounded Ohio Contractor: 'I'm in Disbelief'

Wounded Ohio Contractor: 'I'm in Disbelief'

Shooting Victim's Workers, Firm Have Long Been Big Labor Targets (Source: September 2011 NRTWC Newsletter) Having grown over the course of several decades into one of the largest union-free electrical contracting businesses in the Toledo, Ohio, area, King Electrical Services and its employees are seasoned in dealing with Big Labor harassment, threats and violence. John King started the firm during the 1970's, after first working for a unionized electrical contractor and serving a stint in the military. In his business's early days, Mr. King recalls, "it was nothing to have to regularly buy a new set of tires. The ice pick was the weapon of choice." During a mid-eighties strike, King Electrical, which then had just eight or nine employees, was picketed by more than 50 International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW/AFL-CIO) union militants. One employee had his car trashed and was also beaten up by IBEW thugs. The harassment and violence have never stopped. Just during the first half of this year, goons hurled rocks through King Electrical's shop-front windows, and smashed the windows and slashed the tires of the company's trucks in separate incidents. But somehow none of this prepared Mr. King for what happened to him on the night of August 10, while his wife was away with their grandchildren. After waking up at his home in Monroe County, Mich., 2.5 miles from Toledo, Mr. King noticed that the motion lights in his driveway had come on. He then looked out his front window and saw a man who appeared to be breaking into his SUV. 'It's Not So Surprising That Union Militants Think They're Above the Law' As a resident of a neighborhood where violent crime is practically unheard of, Mr. King unhesitatingly walked out his front door to yell at the apparent thief. So confident was Mr. King that his home was his "safe haven" from the Big Labor thuggery he and his employees have often faced on the job, in fact, that, prone and bloodied in front of his house a few seconds later, he didn't realize he'd been shot.