Taxpayer Funded Union No-Show Jobs Everywhere

Taxpayer Funded Union No-Show Jobs Everywhere

Public Sector Employee Monopoly Bargaining Running Amok! Taxpayer funded federal, state, and municipal no-show jobs exist throughout the country.  In 2002, the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) union Local 12 had 9 such full-time union time jobs at the United States Department of Labor.  These 9 union officials were working full-time on union activities as union employees and officers and never spent any time working as federal employees.  Yet, they were paid by the federal government (taxpayers). In 2003, the NY-NJ Port Authority Police Department union was allowed to have four union officers/"police officers" spend their entire time working on union activity, and none for the Port Authority.  Yet, the Port Authority paid their salaries and benefits. Now, during the NY City Big Snow Slowdown controversy, it comes to light that New York City taxpayers pay six (6) SEIU sanitation officers to work full time on union business, not city business.  BigGovernment .com has the report: [Additional supporting information (to download complete supporting documentation packet, click here)] Big Labor and politicians across the United States have transferred union costs to taxpayers.  For example, SEIU Local 444 (The Sanitation Officers Association, see related snow  slowdown stories) has six full-time union officials who are paid full-time city benefits and salary, yet work 0.00% of the time for New York City.  These Sanitation Officers are working on everything but New York City business – including political activities and golf outings – all on the taxpayers’ dime. SEIU Local 444 – NY City Contract Language (pertinent part)

Right To Work Helps Fuel the Jobs Engine

Right To Work Helps Fuel the Jobs Engine

The publisher of Virginia Business, Bernie Niemeier, reminds readers among the natural advantages of states  such as  California, New York and Virginia it is often the "legal advantages"  "like being the northernmost Right To Work state and having reasonable tort laws and a relatively low corporate income tax rate" that separates Virginia from the pack. Excerpts from Niemeier's  editorial, Job creation is fueled by existing business expansion: Over the past few years, Virginia’s economic development news has been full of big marquee names: Volkswagen, Altria, Hilton, SAIC, Northrop Grumman and others. The commonwealth has held a winning hand in the high-profile game of attracting corporate headquarters from California, New York and other states. Natural advantages such as the Port of Virginia, Dulles Airport and proximity to Washington, D.C., are important parts of our success. Legal advantages — like being the northernmost right-to-work state and having reasonable tort laws and a relatively low corporate income tax rate — also make Virginia an attractive place to do business. When high-profile new business announcements are made, many take credit and rightfully so. Major out-of-state and international relocations involve the governor’s office, the Virginia Economic Development Partnership (VEDP), regional economic development alliances and local-level economic development offices. We’ve been a little less than humble in continually reminding ourselves and others of our reputation as the best-managed state, one of the best states in which to do business and the most business-friendly state, among other accolades. But perhaps Virginia’s existing businesses have been too humble in taking credit for the jobs their expansion and growth have created, especially during difficult economic times. In fact, existing businesses have led the commonwealth in job creation over the past several years.