Oregon Senator helps SEIU organize state employees; threatens gov't officials who may oppose

Oregon Senator helps SEIU organize state employees; threatens gov't officials who may oppose

The Democrat Budget chief of the Oregon Senate is trying silence critics of an organizing drive that added more than 7,700 workers to the union's membership and turned it into the largest in the state. Thanks to campaign contributions, Sen. Richard Devlin is moving to tip the scales in favor of the union organizers.  Jeff Mapes, The Oregonian reports: At the behest of Service Employees International Union, Oregon Senate budget chief Richard Devlin sought to stifle criticism of an organizing drive that added more than 7,700 workers to the union's membership and turned it into the largest in the state. During a drive to organize workers who help care for developmentally disabled Oregonians, Tualatin Democrat wrote a letter to officials who help employ the workers, warning them not to say anything even "mildly" critical of unionization. He also suggested that a successful union drive would help boost legislative support for services for Oregonians with developmental disabilities. . Several officials who received the letter said it appeared Devlin tried to tip the scales in favor of the union's expansion.

Oregon Senator helps SEIU organize state employees; threatens gov't officials who may oppose

Oregon Senator helps SEIU organize state employees; threatens gov't officials who may oppose

The Democrat Budget chief of the Oregon Senate is trying silence critics of an organizing drive that added more than 7,700 workers to the union's membership and turned it into the largest in the state. Thanks to campaign contributions, Sen. Richard Devlin is moving to tip the scales in favor of the union organizers.  Jeff Mapes, The Oregonian reports: At the behest of Service Employees International Union, Oregon Senate budget chief Richard Devlin sought to stifle criticism of an organizing drive that added more than 7,700 workers to the union's membership and turned it into the largest in the state. During a drive to organize workers who help care for developmentally disabled Oregonians, Tualatin Democrat wrote a letter to officials who help employ the workers, warning them not to say anything even "mildly" critical of unionization. He also suggested that a successful union drive would help boost legislative support for services for Oregonians with developmental disabilities. . Several officials who received the letter said it appeared Devlin tried to tip the scales in favor of the union's expansion.

Bullied Over Ballots -- File this under irony.

Jonas Tichenor of Sacramento-TV 13 reports: A SEIU member says she was physically forced out of a room after she questioned union leaders about how they were counting ballots, and she recorded the confrontation on her cell phone. Mariam Nojiam, a state worker for the Department of Motor Vehicles, began recording video as she walked into an SEIU election office while officials were giving instructions on counting procedure. After one of the officials giving instructions asked if there were any questions, Mariam said she spoke up and began asking about large envelopes she says didn’t have any postmarks on them. “Some people sent them in today, some people sent them in yesterday and the day before in priority mail, and there’s no postmark on them,” the official responded. The ballot instructions clearly state that ballots must be received at the election office through the U.S. Postal Service, but when Mariam tried to insist that the envelopes without postmarks shouldn’t be allowed, the official cut her off.

SEIU's Stern and

SEIU's Stern and "Ruthless" Tactics

  Testifying before a House Committee, David Bego described the tactics of the SEIU as 'ruthless." That is no surprise to anyone who has followed the antics of the purple shirted thugs.  From Claire Courchane of The Washington Times: When officials from the Service Employees International Union tried to organize his management-services business in December 2005, David Bego’s refusal to sign a neutrality agreement with union organizers before the vote landed him in a battle he says took four years and cost him $1 million. “I was appalled by the tactics and the ruthlessness they used,” the Indiana businessman told a House committee hearing Thursday. “It was psychological warfare.”